Obesity Relapse: Sometimes The BASTARD Returns


Sometimes The Bastard Returns is available on Amazon.com

Paperback: http://astore.amazon.com/fathfinobl-2…

or http://www.amazon.com/Sometimes-Bastard-Returns-Account-Obesity/dp/1492763365

Kindle: http://astore.amazon.com/fathfinobl-2…

or http://www.amazon.com/Sometimes-Bastard-Returns-Account-Obesity-ebook/dp/B00HGVPCXG/

 

Life is lived in color, but sometimes the answers remain black and white.

 Aloha, Ciao and Stay Healthy,

Joe

************The information contained herein is for information purposes only and is not intended to diagnose or treat any disease or disorder. The posting and videos do not apply to those with an underlying medical or hormonal condition. I advise anyone embarking on a weight loss and fitness plan to have a thorough medical evaluation. You want to be sure that you are physically able to exercise and you don’t have any underlying medical conditions No guarantees are made or to be implied.************

Thanksgiving Multi-Day Over-Splurge


Life is lived in color, but sometimes the answers remain black and white.

Aloha, Ciao and Stay Healthy,

Joe

************The information contained herein is for information purposes only and is not intended to diagnose or treat any disease or disorder. The posting and videos do not apply to those with an underlying medical or hormonal condition. I advise anyone embarking on a weight loss and fitness plan to have a thorough medical evaluation. You want to be sure that you are physically able to exercise and you don’t have any underlying medical conditions No guarantees are made or to be implied.************

RE-LAUNCH of ObesityUndone.com


OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERANow that I have achieved my 2nd interval goal of 244lbs, which is a 50lb drop in weight, I am re-launching the online version of Obesity Undone.

http://www.obesityundone.com/

Subscribers will have access to:

-Weekly motivational videos
-Weekly Video Replies to Emailed Questions
-Weekly Exercise/Eating Spotlight 

-Videos about 3 E’s

-The EATING
-The EXERCISES
-The mental ENERGY

Private Email 

All of this is available for a monthly $10.00 subscription, which will billed each month to your credit, debit or PayPal account.

Results Require Relentless Pursuit


Aloha, Ciao and Stay Healthy,

Joe

************The information contained herein is for information purposes only and is not intended to diagnose or treat any disease or disorder. The posting and videos do not apply to those with an underlying medical or hormonal condition. I advise anyone embarking on a weight loss and fitness plan to have a thorough medical evaluation. You want to be sure that you are physically able to exercise and you don’t have any underlying medical conditions No guarantees are made or to be implied.************

Only We Can Decide If We Are Ready For Fitness


269lbs

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For all that I write, or have said, I never tell anyone that he or she must lose weight, or get in shape — with one exception, myself.

I have had people ask me if I thought they needed to lose weight, and my answer is the same — No.  Whether they are 150lbs or 400lbs, it isn’t for me to decide who needs to lose weight.

It simply isn’t up to me.

Yet, they persist, so finally I answer their question with a question.  “Do you think you need to lose weight?” Their answer will determine if I can assist them.

If they stammer, or have difficulty with an answer — they aren’t ready.

If they answer, “Yes, I need to lose weight and/or get in shape,”  —- they might be ready.

If they answer, “It doesn’t matter, I want to lose weight and/or get fit,” —- they are ready.

When it comes to battling obesity, and getting fit — we are often looking for external motivation.   On occasion, we are seeking validation that we don’t need to take control of our health and wellness.  Both are irrelevant.

If we want to lose weight — we must want to lose weight.

If we want to get fit — we must want to get fit.

If we are healthy and fit, can we live a better life? Most definitely, but as it is with everything in life — we must want it.

I’m not talking about wanting it, as I want a Ferrari, or a mansion or a beach house.  Those are dreams, and many obese people often dream of being fit.  No, that kind of wanting never leads to results.

We must thirst for it as if we haven’t had water in days.

We must hunger for it as if we haven’t eaten in weeks.

We must desire it more than we have ever desired anything in our lives.

However, desire itself isn’t enough — that desire must be combined with determination and discipline. To put forth the effort to successfully battle obesity is not for the faint of heart.  It genuinely isn’t all that difficult, but it does require work and effort.  No one is going to pass a wand and make us fit.  No one is going to cast a spell and make the fat shed from our bodies.

We must be willing to do the work.  We must change our lifestyle to make this happen.  A half-hearted, half-assed approach will yield nothing!  We must take charge of ourselves and make the necessary changes — we must get moving and we must stop eating health robbing foods and we must have strong and unwavering belief in ourselves.

We must want it with a passion that is second to none, because if we do — then we will succeed. 

Aloha, Ciao, and Stay Healthy

Joe

************The information contained herein is for information purposes only and is not intended to diagnose or treat any disease or disorder. The posting and videos do not apply to those with an underlying medical or hormonal condition. I advise anyone embarking on a weight loss and fitness plan to have a thorough medical evaluation. You want to be sure that you are physically able to exercise and you don’t have any underlying medical conditions No guarantees are made or to be implied.************

Can The Gym Be Your Church For Physical Well-being?


If the Church is the place for your spiritual well-being, then the gym can be your place for physical well-being.

In the gym, the sweat from your efforts are the cleansing waters of a baptism. The grunts and groans of effort are the hallelujahs of rejoicement.  And the clanging and banging of iron weights are the rhythmic chants of uplifting hymns.

There are those who claim you should not sweat, that sounds of effort should never escape your mouth and weights that are so heavy to elicit noise should not be hefted.

If you read my book, you will learn what I say to those who espouse moderation, it is my same answer to those who decry genuine effort. Instead of claiming the strain of others are a distraction;  feed off of their energy and strengthen your resolve from their struggle. You would also be surprised to discover, that those who put out hardcore effort, are often the first to help those who truly want to learn and improve themselves.

Zulfiya Chinshanlo World Champion 2009 53kg cl...Image via Wikipedia

I have been lifting weights on and off since I twelve. I will never forget the day my Mom and Dad purchased my first weightlifting set from Sears. I hurriedly opened the box.  The contents were 110 pounds of plastic covered cement and a short iron barbell with the plastic sleeves. I was in heaven, it was that day I began pumping plastic. A few years later, I graduated to a commercial gym, and it was there that I discovered the meaning of the phrase, pumping iron!

To me, there is nothing quite as exhilarating as the smell, noise and energy of a true weightlifting gym. I am brought to life by the clanging and banging of the iron, the grunts and groans that pass the lips of men and women as they try to blast out those last few muscle-building reps. It is cathartic, motivating and uplifting all at the same time.

I’m not sure if it is just me, but their seems to be an effort afoot to stop hard training, to cap enthusiasm and stifle the travails it takes to get real results. About a year ago, I was finishing up what was, to that point, a great workout. I was working two large opposing muscle groups; chest and back.  I was on my last of 36 sets, super-setting decline flyes with dead-lifts. I only had about 225 on the bar, but as we all know, the dead-lift is a brutal exercise, more so when done last and even more so when done as part of a superset. Well, I was brining the iron  down to the floor with some good old fashion banging. The sound of the weights against the rubber mat ramped my adrenaline causing a release of energy to explode me upright.  At the top position, my dead stop caused the weights to shake and there was the clanging.  Like a piston of a high revving engine,  I was rapidly moving up and down. Upon completion of the last set I re-racked the weight. I was soaked in sweat and my grip was almost completely shot; the bar slipped and the weights came crashing down onto the rack.

Gasping for breath I stood up tall, full of self-pride. I just completed three  more reps than I did last workout. Then it happened — the person next to me muttered under their breath, Jesus Christ.”

I paused, unable to believe what I just heard. I thought to myself;  you have to be kidding. I wanted to shout “THIS IS A GYM!” Of course, my parents raised me with manners, so I walked over and apologized. This person did not even acknowledge my apology. So, I edged a little closer and said it a bit louder. Finally, the person reluctantly accepted.

I was so ticked off that to burn off the excess energy, I did six more sets, three more supersets of machine benches and bent over rows. I noticed the mutterer was talking to someone else and when I was done with my sixth set, the person finally went and did another set. I wanted to yell again, “MAYBE IF YOU WOULD ACTUALLY PUT SOME ACTUAL EFFORT INTO YOUR  WORK OUT YOU MIGHT LOOK A LITTLE DIFFERENT THAN YOU DID A YEAR AGO!” But damn my parents raising me to be polite. I just stripped the bar, something this person did NOT do, looked over and said, “good-bye.”

Honestly, is it just me?

When I go to workout I am there to WORKout.

I don’t sit around for 10 minutes between sets, I move from exercise to exercise only pausing long enough to change the weight. I try to be considerate:  I place a towel down on the benches,  I allow people to work in, I always lift under control, I rarely drop a weight, I respect the equipment, I strip every bar and every machine, I replace the weights back to the stacks, I put the dumbells back in their appropriate place on the rack and, I even put them in order if someone else didn’t.

Frederick Winters during 1904 Summer Olympics

So, am I out of line to workout so hard that iron weights ring aloud?

Am I incorrect to push a set to failure that on occasion the weight slips?

Is pushing one self passé?

Is brutal, barbaric,muscle bombing defunct?

Is old school clanging and banging dead?

Please, say it ain’t so!

Never stop sweating!

Never stop grunting!

Never, ever stop clanging and banging!

 

 

Aloha, Ciao and Stay Healthy,

Joe

************The information contained herein is for information purposes only and is not intended to diagnose or treat any disease or disorder. The posting and videos do not apply to those with an underlying medical or hormonal condition. I advise anyone embarking on a weight loss and fitness plan to have a thorough medical evaluation. You want to be sure that you are physically able to exercise and you don’t have any underlying medical conditions No guarantees are made or to be implied.************

Art, Science & Philosophy


I read many research articles, web publications, professional journals, blogs, etc…. I would say out of my week, I devote, on average, about 15 hours reading up on chiropractic information and probably another 15 on general health, weight loss and fitness.  I am involved in both, so I not only desire to keep up-to-date, but it is my responsibility.

Something that really bothers me in much of the debate over weight loss and fitness, is the thinking that because it is in the research, it must me correct and if it isn’t in the research, it must be wrong.  So many downplay the impact of anecdotal experience that they miss the complete and larger point — in health care anecdotal evidence, is often times the basis for case studies; a tool that can’t be left out of any practitioner’s repertoire.  To omit what happens in an individual experience is simply close minded to the importance of applied clinical information.

Now perhaps, I am biased.  I am willing to admit to that, because I am a clinician, but I also am an adjunct faculty member, so I spend some of my time in the world of academia. It is important to understand, that when we read something, there are going to be different types of interpretation.  Interpretation that is based upon who is reading, interpreting and then giving knowledge, or treatment, based on certain information.

The researcher:  A good researcher focuses on the data.  There are few, if any outside influences or experiences to effect the conclusion; which again is based solely upon the data.  Ideally, the researcher should operate in a vacuum, unfortunately, because money influences the ability for one to do research, this isn’t always  the case.

The academic:  A strong adherence to research data and texts.  Since many, not all, in academia have little to no outside experience,  their ability to apply this data to people in the real world is limited.  The academic gives a strong foundation in instruction, that is why many health care  professional schools are rooted in the core sciences for the first year, devoid of any clinical application.  The understanding of the core concepts is very important, but it can be limiting in real world application.

The clinician: Understand the core concepts of the academic, takes in as much information as possible from the researcher, then utilizes a comprehensive approach based upon clinical analysis and experience to design an effective treatment plan/protocol for the patient.  The clinician can’t be so myopic in his or her view to limit themselves to a standard protocol that may not be working.  The clinician must be willing to adapt, because their is an understanding that each individual is unique, and responses are often times different to the same protocols.  The clinician can actually  see good in contradictory research and take parts from all research, even those that academic and/or researcher would view as contradictory, to benefit the patient.

The clinician’s skilled are a combination of:

The science: The research and foundation principles.

The philosophy: The individual belief system that drives the clinician to care for others.

The art:  The application of all of the above.

It is important to understand who is giving us information concerning fitness, exercise and weight loss, therefore we can take the strong points of each when making a decision.

Many get so bogged down in who is right and who is wrong, that the benefits of each gets lost.  And worse yet, many get so lost in the minutia, focusing so intently on a drop of water they miss the majesty of the ocean, they never see the complete picture.

Their view is so narrow, that their vision is not merely distorted, it may as well be absent.

Aloha, Ciao and Stay Healthy,

Joe

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************The information contained herein is for information purposes only and is not intended to diagnose or treat any disease or disorder. The posting and videos do not apply to those with an underlying medical or hormonal condition. I advise anyone embarking on a weight loss and fitness plan to have a thorough medical evaluation. You want to be sure that you are physically able to exercise and you don’t have any underlying medical conditions No guarantees are made or to be implied.************